Intellectual Freedom Handbook

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PREFACE

This is the Fifth Edition of the Texas Library Association's INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM HANDBOOK. A perennial favorite among TLA publications, the text serves libraries and librarians in a variety of settings. Passage of the September 1, 1993, Texas Open Records Act and several updated ALA interpretations mandated this new edition.

The Intellectual Freedom Committee appreciates all those who contributed experience with and knowledge of the basic tenets of free access to information in a time of unprecedented change and challenges.

DEDICATION

This manual is dedicated to the memory of John Henry Faulk
in recognition of his lifelong fight for civil rights, racial equality, and human dignity.

John Henry Faulk
1913 - 1990

"Freedom, the joys of a democratic society, had to extend to all people or it was a myth." John Henry Faulk was an eloquent speaker for civil liberties, and these words reflect his intense belief in the rights of the individual. Texans will always revere Faulk as one of their greatest storytellers, an Austin native whose folksy, salty humor perfectly embodied the character of their land. He will also be remembered as one of America's most outspoken defenders of the First Amendment and freedom of speech.

In the late fifties, Faulk fought back against McCarthyism by winning a libel suit against AWARE, Inc., a major contributor to the blacklist tyranny that had brought his successful career in radio and television to a halt. In one of the most dramatic trials of modern times, he exposed the activities of AWARE and other vigilante organizations and broke the back of television blacklisting. The story of this struggle, Fear On Trial, became a best-seller and an award- winning television movie.

Created on Aug 17, 2011 | Last updated August 23, 2011