Author Feature-A. G. Howard

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

A G Howard

A. G. Howard

Splintered

A. G. Howard wrote Splintered while working at a school library. She always wondered what would've happened had the subtle creepiness of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland taken center stage, and she hopes her darker and funkier tribute to Carroll will inspire readers to seek out the stories that won her heart as a child. The sequel Unhinged is out now and the third and final book Ensnared comes out in January 2015. She lives in Amarillo, Texas. 


 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

Author Blog

Facebook

Pinterest

Twitter

Tumbr

YouTube

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Book Trailer

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon YouTube icon



Book Discussion Questions 

Printable Copy

  1. Have you ever read the original Lewis Carroll novels? If so, do you feel that Splintered is a good companion, and why or why not?
  2.  If you haven't read the originals, did reading Splintered give you the desire to read them?
  3. This book was classified as young adult. Do you think it is satisfying enough for adults too?
  4. Did you feel the three main characters were unique yet relatable?
  5. Did you have a favorite character? A least favorite?
  6. Alyssa's relationship with her mother, although strained, is one of the most important in the book because it motivates her to take her journey. Do you feel like Alyssa ultimately accomplished what she set out to do, and why or why not?
  7. Was the world-building well drawn? What part of Wonderland would you like to visit? What, if anything, would you change about the world and its inhabitants?
  8. Were you able to guess any aspects of the plot, or did it take you by surprise? 
  9. Was the true reason Alyssa was pulled into Wonderland a surprise to you?
  10. What did you think of the ending? Do you think it was a good place to stop or would you have liked to know what happens next?
  11. There is a sequel planned. Will you read it? Why or why not?

Book discussion were taken from http://splinteredbook1.blogspot.com/p/splintered-book-club-questions.html.


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

Academic Program: The Science of Skateboarding

Introduction

This program is designed to help teach physics in a fun and interesting way using the popularity of skateboarding.

Books to Display

  • Splintered by A.G. Howard
  • Advanced Skateboarding: From Kick Turns to Catching Air by Aaron Rosenberg
  • The Concrete Wave: The History of Skateboarding by Michael Brooke
  • The Disposable Skateboard Bible by Sean Cliver
  • Cricketman by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • Grind by Eric Walters
  • Dropping in with Andy Mac: The Life of a Pro Skateboarder by Andy Macdonald with Theresa Foy DiGeronimo
  • Freestyle Skateboarding Tricks: Flat Ground, Rails, Transitions by Sean D'Arcy and Phillip Marshall
  • Getting Air by Dan Gutman
  • Have Board, Will Travel: The Definitive History of Surf, Skate, and Snow by Jamie Brisick
  • Paranoid Park by Blake Nelson
  • Sk8er Boy by Mari Mancusi
  • Skateboarder's Start-Up: A Beginner's Guide to Skateboarding by Doug Werner, Steve Badillo ; photography by Steve Badillo
  • The Skateboarding Field Manual by Ryan Stutt
  • Slam by Nick Hornby

TEKS

  • Physics 1a, 1b, 2c, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3f, 4b, 4c, 6b, 6c

Supplies

  • Internet access
  • Projector/television to watch YouTube Videos

Activity

As a warm up, and way to grab your students' attention, watch school appropriate YouTube videos of skateboarders. (Examples below.) Make sure to cue the videos. Using Exploratorium Skateboard's "Trick Science" tab explain to students how physics is used and exploited in performing the Ollie, Front-Side 180 and Pumping. The Font-Side 180 has a simple lab that can be performed by you and your students with no additional materials.

Resources for Teens

Resources for Teachers


Academic Program: The "Key" to Symbolism – A Symbolism Unit Paired with A.G. Howard's Splintered

Purpose

The purpose of this program is to teach or emphasize symbolism in reading and writing. It will include specific instructions on the use of symbolism in the selected book or with any fiction text students may be reading in class. This program is intended to be flexible and adaptable to any English class.

Books to Display or Book Talk

  • The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Alice in the Country of Hearts by Soumei Hoshino (Manga)
  • Splintered by A. G. Howard
  • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell
  • The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  • Any other story, novel, play, or poem that you have taught containing symbolism

TEKS

  • English 1 - 2, 7, 8, 15c, 16, 18, 19, 24a
  • English 2 – 2, 7, 8, 12a, 12c, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26
  • English 3 – 2, 5a, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15c, 16, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26
  • English 4 – 2, 7, 8, 12, 15c, 16, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26
  • This would also work with all PAP, AP and DC classes

Activity #1 - "Key" to Symbolism

Supplies

  • 30 or so random keys
  • Copies of books or stories
  • Chart paper and markers
  • Copies of the piece of literature

Description

Attention Grabber (8-12 minutes)

Begin by giving every student a key as they enter the classroom. Have a prompt at the front of the classroom asking students to speculate individually on the purpose of the key and have them write down their speculations. Next have students share their key's "Story" or purpose with the class or a small group. If divided into small groups have each group select one key to share with the rest of the class. Finally, lead students in a discussion on the purpose of keys in general and create of list of the uses on your board, smart board or piece of chart paper answers may include: to open, unlocked, answer, etc...

Lesson (10-15 minutes)

Short answer/Open-ended response questions. Examples:

Discuss the definition of symbol and symbolism.

Discuss what a key might symbolize.

Discuss what the key specifically means in Splintered. Answers may include: unlocking Aly's family heritage, unlocking the past, the key to knowing Aly's mother, unlocking "Wonderland", the key to relationships, etc...

Using the quote describing the key (located on the back cover of Splintered), illustrate Aly's key.

Write a SAR/OER for "What does the key in Splintered symbolize?" Remember that all responses need to be supported by evidence from the text. (See attached printable handout)

You can substitute any symbol or story for the suggested title.

Activity #2 - Persuasive Essay 

Write an up to one page persuasive essay addressing the provided prompt.

Prompt: Your past defines who you are.

Write an essay discussing if your past determines what kind of person you will become. Revise and edit the paper as you see fit.

Activity #3 - Symbolism SAR/OER

Prompt: What does the Key in Splintered symbolize?

Revise and edit your answer. Edit and rewrite on a separate sheet of notebook paper.

Activity #4 - Persuasive Essay

Persuasive Writing Prompt

Read the information below:

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." George Santayana (1863 – 1952), The Life of Reason, Volume 1, 1905

Have students think carefully about this statement: 'Your past defines who you are and who you will become.' Students will write essays stating supporting or refuting the above statement.

Students should:

State position clearly

Use appropriate organization

Provide specific support for their argument

Edit writing for grammar, mechanics, and spelling


Academic Program: Who Am I? Genealogy Project

Introduction

This project is designed to bring teenagers closer to their ancestors and their personal history through family research. They will conduct research using genealogy resources along with online government resources. It is recommended that you check local libraries for free genealogical databases. (You may even see if a local public librarian would be willing to do an in-class genealogy demonstration. Students should use MLA format for all research citations.

Books to Display

  • Splintered by A. G. Howard
  • Climbing Your Family Tree: Online and Offline Genealogy by Ira Wolfman
  • Plugging into Your Past: How to Find Real Family History Records Online by Rick Crume
  • Genealogy Online for Dummies by April Leigh Helm, Matthew L. Helm
  • The Genealogy Handbook: The Complete Guide to Tracing Your Family Tree by Ellen Galford
  • The Complete Idiot's Guide to Online Genealogy by Rhonda McClure
  • Short Cuts in Family History by Michael Gandy
  • Tracing Your Roots: Locating Your Ancestors Through Landscape and History by Meg Wheeler
  • The Maze of Bones (39 Clues #1) by Rick Riordan
  • Backwater by Joan Bauer
  • Cultural history books that pertain to y our personal students.

TEKS

  • United States History Studies Since 1877 - 26c, 29a, 29d, 30, 32
  • World History Studies – 1f, 17c, 21a, 24a, 29c, 29f, 30, 31
  • English 1 - 2, 7, 8, 15c, 16, 18, 19, 24a
  • English 2 – 2, 7, 8, 12a, 12c, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26
  • English 3 – 2, 5a, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15c, 16, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26
  • English 4 – 2, 7, 8, 12, 15c, 16, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

This would also work with all PAP, AP and DC classes

Activity 1 – Who Am I?

Warmup/Intro activity

Have students list everything they think they know about their families. When they have finished creating their lists break the class into groups of 3-4 students. Have students share their lists in their small groups. Each group should pick the three most interesting details to share with the class as a whole.

Description – Students will be researching their backgrounds through family interviews, family records, and online information.

Students need to interview their parents to find out their parents':

Full names

Birthdates

Place of birth

Grandparents full names, place of birth and birth date

(see handout)

After this knowledge is acquired, they should do a general internet search on their family members following where the digital trail leads. Encourage students to visit their public libraries as most have free access to genealogy materials. (Prior to the unit, contact your local public library about available resources and ask about a database demonstration for your students.) Students will then create a report/presentation based on the information they find. Format preference should always be given.

Types of presentations they may create:

Presi

Power Point

Timeline

Posters

Paper

Students will then present findings to the class. Now if you have a foster kid or an adopted kid, you may choose to give them an alternate assignment. Always keep the students in mind when assigning any project. You don't want to alienate a group of students that do not know their origins.


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Active Programs

Printable Copy

Hatter's Tea Party‍

Introduction

Dive into the world of Wonderland by experiencing a maddening good time.

Books to Display or Book Talk

  • Hatter M, Vol. 1: The Looking Glass Wars by Frank Beddor, Liz Cavalier, and Ben Templesmith
  • Looking Glass Wars by Frank Beddor
  • Tithe: A Modern Fairytale by Holly Black
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll
  • Steampunk Tea Party: Cakes & Toffees to Jams & Teas - 30 Neo-Victorian Steampunk Recipes from Far-Flung Galaxies, Underwater Worlds & Airborne Excursions by Jema 'Emilly Ladybird' Hewitt
  • Alice in Verse: The Lost Rhymes of Wonderland by J.T. Holden
  • Alice in the Country of Hearts: The Mad Hatter's Late Night Tea Party Vol 2 by QuinRose and Riko Sakura
  • Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter
  • The Faerie Wars by Herbie Brennan

List of Tea Party Supplies

  • Tables, Chairs (number varies based on expected turnout)
  • Table clothes
  • Small plates (recommend "fancy" paper/plastic plates)
  • Styrofoam cups
  • Selection of Tea Party appropriate foods (see below)
  • Electric kettle (or other source of boiling water)
  • Individual Tea bags
  • Tea pots - Have coworkers lend as centerpieces for the party or try the dollar store
  • Plastic flatware
  • Croquette set

Description of Tea Party Activity

You can make this program as simple or elaborate as you desire. Your budget and your passion are the only restraints! Recommended time is 1-2.5 hours. Teens get to immerse themselves in the world of Wonderland (or at least your interpretation of it) with this program. Tea, crumpets, tea cakes and games galore!

Activity #1: Mad, Mad Teacups

List of Supplies

  • Dollar store tea cups & saucers (1 per teen) *Dollar store cups/mugs work better because the glaze is cheaper and allows the sharpie to "set".*
  • Porcelain Markers (These can be found at craft stores like Hobby Lobby or Michaels.)
  • Pencils
  • Quote Sheet 
  • Sharpie Mug Baking Directions

Description of Activity #1

Prior to activity make sure to run cups through a dishwasher before teens decorate to remove any dust or dirt. If you do this a few days before the program make sure to wipe cups down with rubbing alcohol to remove any dust or oils. First have teens draw their design or write their quote lightly in pencil. (See sheet below for a list of quotes.) Once the penciled design is complete have teens go over design with the Oil Based Sharpies. Each teen should receive a half-page instruction sheet for how to set the permanent markers on the tea cups which they can do at home.

There are several wonderful blog posts that detail the process of making Sharpie Marker Cups/Mugs:

Craftaholics Anonymous

Cozy Old Farmhouse

The Perfect Line

Activity #2: Pin the Hat on the Hatter

List of Supplies

  • Where's My Hat Poster (see below)
  • 5-10 Copies of the Top Hat (see below)
  • Bulletin Board/Cork Board
  • Push pins or double sided tape
  • Blindfold

Description of Activity #2

What's a Tea Party without games? Prior to the Tea Party, print out and laminate the 'Where's My Hat' Poster (see below) as well as several pink top hats then have teens play "Pin the Hat on the Carroll". To play have player who will attempt to "Hat the Carroll" put on blindfold then spin character three times chanting "paint the roses red!". Face player towards the Carroll and let them stumble forward to try and place their hat atop his head.

Activity #3: Wonderland Dance Party

List of Supplies

Description of Activity #3

Place characters cards (see below) in a top hat and have teens select a character. When the music starts teens must dance in the manner of their character (as interpreted by them) for the duration of the song. At the end of the song try to guess who everyone is; winners get a top hat.

Activity #4: Mini-Top Hats

List of Supplies

  • Duct Tape (assorted)
  • Scissors
  • Cutting mat/cardboard
  • Razor blade
  • 2 Jar lids (or other round stencil); one larger and one smaller
  • Feathers
  • Sharpies

Description of Activity #4

Teens will use duct tape to make mini Top Hats of their very own. This video by JetpackCrafts. For personalization allow teens to use feathers or sharpies to decorate their top hats.

Resources for Teens

  • Jabberwocky and Other Poems by Lewis Carroll
  • Alice in Wonderland: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack by Avril Lavigne and Danny Elfman
  • What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England by Daniel Pool
  • Disney's Alice in Wonderland: A Visual Companion by Mark Salisbury and Tim Burton
  • The Jane Austen Handbook by Margaret Sullivan

Professional Resources for Librarian and Teacher

  • The Vintage Tea Party Book: A Complete Guide to Hosting your Perfect Party by Angel Adoree
  • What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England by Daniel Pool
  • Everything Alice: The Wonderland Book of Makes and Bakes by Hannah Read-Baldry and Christine Leech
  • Disney's Alice in Wonderland: A Visual Companion by Mark Salisbury and Tim Burton
  • The Jane Austen Handbook by Margaret Sullivan
  • Paper to Petal: 75 Whimsical Paper Flowers to Craft by Hand by Rebecca Thuss and Patrick Farrell

Program Flyers, Poster, Advertisements, Bulletin Board Ideas, Templates, Rubrics, Pictures etc.


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Passive Program
Moth & Butterfly 

Printable Copy

Introduction

Teens will learn about the insects that make up the Order Lepidoptera and the differences between moths and butterflies. Participants will then create their own Splintered-inspired species of Lepidoptera.

Books to Display or Book Talk

  • Caterpillars in the Field and Garden: A Field Guide to the Butterfly Caterpillars of North America by Thomas J. Allen, James P. Brock, and Jeffrey Glassberg
  • Peterson Field Guide to Moths of Northeastern North America by David Beadle and Seabrooke Leckie
  • The Life Cycles of Butterflies: From Egg to Maturity, a Visual Guide to 23 Common Garden Butterflies by Judy Burris and Wayne Richards
  • The Butterfly Clues by Kate Ellison
  • Fearless by Cornelia Funke
  • Butterflies of the World by Gilles MartinThe Illustrated World Encyclopedia of Butterflies and Moths: A Natural History and Identification Guide by Sally Morgan
  • The Last Monarch Butterfly: Conserving the Monarch Butterfly in a Brave New World by Phil Schappert
  • Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded by Douglas W. Tallamy and Rick Darke
  • Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America's Bees and Butterflies by The Xerces Society

Supply List

Description

Using an interactive display, teens will learn the differences between butterflies and other members of the Lepidoptera Order. Butterfly and moth images are interspersed with fun Lepidoptera facts to create a display sure to draw teens. Provide coloring sheets and scissors to let teens create their own Splintered-inspired Lepidoptera species which they can add to the board with pushpins or staples.

Resources for Librarians and Teachers

‍Posters, Flyers, etc

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version Share this
Created on Mar 31, 2014 | Last updated July 15, 2015