Author Feature-Libba Bray

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Libba Bray

Libba Bray

The Diviners

Libba Bray is the author of the New York Times bestseller Beauty Queens, the 2010 Printz Award-winning Going Bovine, and the acclaimed Gemma Doyle trilogy. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. 

--bio from author's website

 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

Author Blog

Book Website

Facebook

Twitter

Educator's Guide

Diviner's Radio Series 


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Book Trailer

 


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Academic Program
The Roaring Twenties – The Diviners by Libba Bray Extended 

Printable Copy

Introduction

This project will introduce the student to well-known figures from the 1920's, exercise creative writing skills, and address issues of the time period in relation to modern times.

Books to Display

Fiction

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Harlem Summer by Walter Dean Myers

Celeste's Harlem Renaissance by Eleanora Tate

A Song for Harlem by Patricia C. McKissack

The Adventures of Michael MacInnes by Jeff Carney

Vixen by Jillian Larkin

Sirens by Janet Fox

Non-Fiction

Flappers and the New American Woman by Catherine Gourley

The Roaring Twenties edited by Stuart A. Kallen

The Roaring Twenties: Biographies by Kelly King Howes

The 20's and 30's: Flappers and Vamps by Cally Blackman

The 1920s by Erica Hanson

The 1920s edited by John F. Wukovits

Daily Life in the United States: 1920-1929 by David E Kyvig

Activity #1- The Roaring Twenties Biography Project

List of Supplies

  • Computer access
  • Internet Access
  • Database Access
  • Research Materials
  • PowerPoint, Prezi or other presentation program
  • Costumes and props (as desired)

Description of Activity

This is a large project covering well-known figures from the 1920's era. The process will teach students about selecting an appropriate subject, researching from a variety of resources, formatting a biographical research paper, creating a presentation that accurately conveys details about their subject's life. The project is three parts: research/note taking; outline/paper; and presentation. Instructors may choose to combine all three parts for one grade or split them into three individual assignments.

Research

The student will choose a subject for research who is a well-known or influential person from the 1920's. The subject can be a musician, artist, gangster, author, suffragist, lawmaker, or any other person approved by the teacher. Students should understand when selecting a subject that they will be dressing as their subject during the presentation. For help choosing a subject, here are a few websites the students may visit for information:

Students will be required to use 3-5 sources for their research; which may include books, encyclopedias, and databases. Students will use note cards to take notes from resources that answer the following (or similar) questions about the subject:

  • What is the subject's full real name?
  • Did the subject have a nick name or alias?
  • When/where was the subject born?
  • What was the subject's historical importance during the 1920s?

This is a great resource for obtaining biographical information on a subject: http://www.macmillanreaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/biographyWorksheetElementary.pdf

Paper

Students will use their research notes to create the following outline for a 4-5 page research paper:

Introduction: Briefly describe who the person was and what notable thing they did that had an impact on history.
Personal Information: Birthdate and birthplace; Family life; education; occupation(s); death date and location; Include a timeline of the person's life.

Accomplishments: What did the person accomplish that makes him/her memorable? What contribution did they make to society

Qualities: What are some qualities that made the person worth reading about?

Students' Choice: Choose something about your person to write about.

Students will then use this outline to create a page rough draft. Once students have written their rough draft they will exchange papers for peer review and comments. Students will then revise, edit and re-write their research papers. Final drafts will include a full bibliography citing the resources used for the research paper.

Presentation

Using presentation software (PowerPoint, Prezi, etc.) students will create a 3-5 minute presentation highlighting important information and major events from the subject's life.

A picture or photograph of the subject MUST be included in the presentation. Students will dress in costume that best displays the subject or at least the styles and fashion that would have been worn by the subject and his/her historical peers. Props to show who and what the subject is famous for are a bonus to the presentation. (Remind students that props and costumes must conform to school rules, so no toy guns or knives and no dress code defying costumes.)

TEKS

  • English 1 – 6, 9, 12, 13, 15d, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
  • English 2 – 6, 9, 12, 13, 15d, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
  • English 3 – 6, 9, 12, 13, 15d, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
  • English 4 – 6, 9, 12, 13, 15d, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
  • United States History Since 1887 - 6, 24b, 25a, 25b, 26a, 26c, 26d, 29, 30

Activity #2 - Creative Writing: Tell Your Own Ghost Story

Description of Activity

This activity will use student's past knowledge to create a written account of their favorite ghost stories. Principles of narrative writing should all be included in the paper that should be at least 3 pages long. Students will be offered the opportunity to "perform" their stories at a storytelling concert (this could be for the class, the school, or for an elementary school).

Students will work in a small group to talk about their favorite ghost stories and decide which one to use for the assignment. After deciding which stories to include, students will outline their story using narrative format (Example: http://thewritersalley.com/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/NarrativeEssayOutline.pdf) Students will then write a first draft; exchange papers for peer review; revise and write final draft of their ghost stories.

Bonus points will be awarded to students who volunteer to "perform" their stories for a storytelling concert. Storytelling requires the performer to memorize the script and "tell" the story rather than read it from a piece of paper. Here are some tips for good storytelling: http://www.aaronshep.com/storytelling/Tips3.html and http://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/a-storytelling-guide-for-those-who-stink-at-storytelling.html

TEKS

  • Theater 1-1A, 1C, 1D, 1F, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4A, 4B, 4C
  • English 1 – 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20a, 24, 25, 26
  • English 2 – 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20a, 24, 25, 26
  • English 3 – 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20a, 24, 25, 26
  • English 4 - 8, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20a, 24, 25, 26

Activity #3: Let's Talk about Prohibition – Debating Legalization of Recreational Marijuana

Description of Activity

For this activity small groups of students will research and debate the pros and cons to the legalization of recreational marijuana and relate it to the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920's. Students will work with a partner to research their assigned viewpoint (pro or con) of the issue of legalizing recreational marijuana. The research should have factual data that can be supported by authoritative sources. A minimum of 3 sources should be used. Students will present their arguments in front of the class.

For help choosing an argument, here are a few websites the students may visit for information:

Steps

Outline - groups will outline their debate (see attachment for debate outline)

Notecards – notecards should document which source the information was found in using MLA (or whatever is applicable) format

Bibliography – Using MLA (or whatever is applicable) format

Mini -Debate – Students will debate a group of students with the opposing viewpoint for the class to score

Recommended format and scoring rubric can be found hereWebsites for help with Debate -

TEKS

  • United States History Since 1887 – 29a, 29b, 29c, 29f, 30a, 30b, 32
  • United States Government – 14b, 20a, 20c, 20d, 21a, 21b, 21c, 21d

 


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Active Program

Having a Ball

Printable Copy

Introduction

Get your teens in the spirit with a Roaring 20s themed ball! This can be done with varying degrees of complexity and can be adapted to any library situation.

Books to Display

  • The Fashion Sourcebook-1920s (Fiell and Dirix)
  • 400 Art Deco Motifs (McCallum)
  • Art Deco Complete: The Definitive Guide to the Decorative Arts of the 1920s and 1930s (Duncan)
  • Black Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance (Egar)

Activity: Roaring 20s Ball--Glad Rags, Eats and All That Jazz

Supplies

  • Teens can supply their own 20s inspired fashion
  • 20s era music
  • Snacks and drinks (see resources for ideas)

Instructions

Encourage your teens to come in costume; 1920s inspired fashion has been popular of late so should be easy to find. Remind your teens that costumes don't have to be fancy or vintage--cloche hats, newsboys and fedoras have been popular lately and are pretty easy to find. They can even make women's headbands can be made from strips of lace. Have an Art Deco inspired craft on hand, perhaps something to assist in creating a costume for those who don't attend "in dress".

If a teen advisory group is helping out, there are many great examples of the clothes (and hair!) available online. If your teens are committed to the idea, try playing music from the 1920s. You can offer some vintage style snacks or just the grape juice and finger foods. Many simple and readily available foods and snacks will fit the bill. Invite participants to perform a Harlem Renaissance poetry "slam" where they perform works written during that movement.

Websites

Resources for Librarians and Teachers

Activity: Art Deco Inspired Photo Matting/Frame

Supplies

  • Card stock
  • Different samples of Art Deco style patterns
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Stick on magnets (optional) OR You can purchase inexpensive frames here. 

Instructions

Did you snap some great photos of your teens in their 1920s fashions from the Roaring 20s Ball? Create a way to display those photos in period style. Fold the card stock in half to make a tent style frame (or cut it to whatever size suits your photos) and decorate however much of it will be visible with Art Deco motifs for the easiest frames. You can also use stick on magnets to make the photos hang. Included in the resources are links to instructions for folding origami frames, too, if your teens would prefer--this would work great with some Art Deco style scrapbooking paper.

Resources for Teens

Resources for Librarians and Teachers

  • Origami Paper Frame
  • For a more ambitious craft with Art Deco style paper, here is a tutorial for pendant making 

Activity: Harlem Renaissance Poetry Slam

Supplies

Samples of Harlem Renaissance era poetry and poet bios

Instructions

This program can be run either as part of a Roaring 20's Ball or as a stand-alone event. Host a mock poetry slam where participants select poems from the Harlem Renaissance to perform. For each poem, the reader can begin her performance with a short introduction about the poem's author. The audience can vote on their favorites, have a discussion about the works or simply enjoy hearing a selection of poems from one of the pivotal moments in American literature.

Resources for Teens

Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance Poetry


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Passive Program
What's Your Psychic Score? 

Printable Copy

Introduction

This activity is designed to test psychic abilities using the Zener ESP cards. Although it would be more effective with a partner, individuals can test their psychic potential as well.

Books to Display

  • ESP by Stuart Kallen
  • First Sight by James C. Carpenter
  • The Reality of ESP: a Physicist's Proof of Psychic Phenomena by Russel Targ
  • The ESP Enigma by Diane Hennacy Powell
  • A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray
  • Miss Peregrine's Home for Particular Children by Ransom Riggs
  • The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

Supplies

  • Zener Cards (see Resources for Librarians and Teachers)
  • Bulletin board
  • Paper
  • Printer

Instructions

Print out or create five sets of Zener cards or one set for however many rows you choose to place on your display. The Zener cards should be in rows affixed in a random order to the display. The cards will folded (like table tents) so that the flaps can be lifted to see the answers. If two people are at the board at the same time, one can look at each card in turn while the other tries to "read" the correct answer from the looker's thoughts. A lone participant can try to glean the answers (perhaps the librarian left a psychic impression while assembling the board?) before lifting the card flaps. The display should include a brief explanation of the Zener cards which were developed a few years after the historical events of The Diviners takes place.

Resources for Teens

A skeptic's review of the Zener ESP test

Resources for Librarians and Teachers

Zener templates and experiment info

 

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Resources

Academic Program

Active Program

Passive Program


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Created on Mar 26, 2014 | Last updated July 15, 2015