Author Feature-Kay Honeyman

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Kay Honeyman

Kay Honeyman

The Fire Horse Girl

Kay Honeyman grew up in Fort Worth, Texas and attended Baylor University, graduating with a Bachelors and Masters in English Language and Literature. Her first novel, The Fire Horse Girl, comes out in January 2013. It is being published by Arthur A. Levine/Scholastic. She currently teaches middle school and lives in Dallas, Texas.

--bio from author's website


 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

Facebook

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Author Visit Kit

 


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Book Trailer


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The Fire Horse Girl Reading Quiz

Printable Copy

Questions

  1. Jade Moon's father is arranging a marriage for Jade Moon with __________. 
    1. Fourth Brother Gou
    2. Elder Chan
    3. Sterling Promise
    4. Pim
  2. Nushi tells Jade Moon the story of ___________________.
    1. Theseus and the Minotaur
    2. Cowherd and Weaver Girl
    3. Pygmalion
    4. Sun and Rainbow
  3. True or false? At the beginning of the story, Jade Moon prefers going to America over staying in China.
    1. True
    2. False
  4. Who else travels to America with Jade Moon and Sterling Promise?
    1. Jade Moon's grandfather
    2. Jade Moon's grandmother
    3. Jade Moon's mother
    4. Jade Moon's father
  5. What was inside the red pouch Nushi gave to Jade Moon before Jade Moon left for America?
    1. An ivory Chess piece
    2. A piece of jade
    3. A phone number
    4. A heart-shaped locket
  6. Why did Snow Lily try to hang herself? 
    1. She knew she would never get off Angel Island 
    2. She was being sent back to China 
    3. She had been purchased by an American businessman 
    4. She was being forced to marry
  7. "And then I understood. The room was a burial ground for dreams. The people in this room had broken hearts like mine." When she thinks this, Jade Moon is looking at... 
    1. The tomb for deceased Chinese women 
    2. A clinic for sick prisoners 
    3. Photographs and drawings tacked to walls 
    4. Poetry written on walls
  8. How does Jade Moon escape the Island? 
    1. She marries a guard 
    2. She pretends to be very ill 
    3. She steals men's clothing 
    4. She jumps out a window into the ocean
  9. When Jade Moon and Harry go to pick up a delivery from the Angel Island Ferry, Jade Moon worries that... 
    1. Sterling Promise ill be on the ferry and recognize her 
    2. Harry knows who she is and plans to return her 
    3. The soldiers on the dock will remember her 
    4. Harry will make her handcuff Spring Blossom 
  10. Miss Donaldson asks Jade Moon to help her by 
    1. Locating brothels in Chinatown 
    2. Finding out who Mr. Hon works for 
    3. Going back onto Angel Island to help girls escape 
    4. Looking for Spring Blossom's relatives in California  

Answer Key

  1. a
  2. b
  3. a
  4. d
  5. b
  6. b
  7. d
  8. c
  9. a
  10. a


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Academic Program
Introduction to Angel Island, California 

Printable Copy

Introduction/Purpose of Program

Much of The Fire Horse Girl takes place on Angel Island, California, also known as the "Ellis Island of the West." This program will introduce students to Angel Island as it compares with Ellis Island and the hardships that immigrants faced in both locations.

TEKS

113.18--Middle School Social Studies

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to:

(A) trace characteristics of various contemporary societies in regions that resulted from historical events or factors such as invasion, conquests, colonization, immigration, and trade

(23) Culture. The student understands the relationships between and among people from various groups, including racial, ethnic, and religious groups, during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The student is expected to:

(A) identify selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups that settled in the United States and explain their reasons for immigration;

(B) explain the relationship between urbanization and conflicts resulting from differences in religion, social class, and political beliefs;

(C) identify ways conflicts between people from various racial, ethnic, and religious groups were resolved;

(D) analyze the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity; and

(E) identify the political, social, and economic contributions of women to American society.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to:

(A) trace characteristics of various contemporary societies in regions that resulted from historical events or factors such as invasion, conquests, colonization, immigration, and trade; and

(B) analyze the historical background of various contemporary societies to evaluate relationships between past conflicts and current conditions.

Detailed Description of the Program

Most students have heard of Ellis Island in New York, where millions of immigrants, mostly European, entered the United States between 1892-1954. But few have heard of Angel Island, California, where millions of Asian immigrants attempted to enter the US. In this program, students will learn about Angel Island and the hardships the immigrants held there faced.

Use a map to locate Angel Island, Ellis Island, and major immigrant countries for both.

Discuss why people chose to leave everything behind to seek a new life in America. Why does Jade Moon leave China? Are her expectations realistic? How do Jade Moon's expectations compare with the expectations of Ellis Island immigrants?

Discuss the hardships immigrants faced in both locations.

Have students use chart paper to compare/contrast Angel Island and Ellis Island in a Double Bubble (Venn Diagram) Thinking Map.

Examine the inscription on the Statue of Liberty (video linked below). What does this inscription mean? Considering what happened to Jade Moon and other Asian immigrants, do you think this inscription rings true? Does it still apply to immigration today?

Written assignment--Imagine you are a Chinese immigrant stranded on Angel Island. You know your family members back in China hope to join you in America. Write a letter from the perspective of this Chinese immigrant. What is your day like? What do you do all day? Do you want your family to join you? How do you persuade them to come or not come?

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

Burgan, Michael. Ellis Island: An Interactive History Adventure. Capstone Press, 2014. 

This book describes how immigrants left their homelands and came to the U.S. searching for a better life with their first stop being Ellis Island, a receiving station. The reader's choices reveal the perspectives of a Russian Jewish girl, a teenage Italian boy, and a German immigrant.

Glazer, Linda. Emma's Poem. Houghton Mifflin, 2010.

Details the inspiration for and history of Emma Lazarus' sonnet which is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty's plaque.

Thornton, Jeremy. The Gold Rush: Chinese Immigrants Come to America (1848-1882). PowerKids Press, 2004.

This book briefly describes the reasons for Chinese immigration to the United States during the late 19th century, and the challenges they faced on arrival. 

List of Supplies

  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • US map

Resources (print and electronic)

Websites

Video


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Active Program
If the Walls could Talk

Printable Copy

Introduction

This program's purpose is to enlighten individuals to the historical significance of poetry in American History through Angel Island's story and the writings of immigrants that still remain etched into the walls. Using the inspiration of Angel Island's found poetry, the library will engage its patrons in an exploration of understanding the experiences of others through literature and the exploration of their own selves and experiences through their own writing.

Discovering Angel Island: The Story Behind the Poems


 

TEKS

§110.18. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 6, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(15) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

B) write poems using:

(i) poetic techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia);

(ii) figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors); and

(iii) graphic elements (e.g., capital letters, line length).

§110.18. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 6, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

26) Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A) listen to and interpret a speaker's purpose by explaining the content, evaluating the delivery of the presentation, and asking questions or making comments about the evidence that supports a speaker's claims;

(C) draw conclusions about the speaker's message by considering verbal communication (e.g., word choice, tone) and nonverbal cues (e.g., posture, gestures, facial expressions).

§113.18. Social Studies, Grade 6, Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

(18) Culture. The student understands the relationship that exists between the arts and the societies in which they are produced. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the relationships that exist between societies and their architecture, art, music, and literature;

(B) relate ways in which contemporary expressions of culture have been influenced by the past;

(C) describe ways in which contemporary issues influence creative expressions; and

(D) identify examples of art, music, and literature that have transcended the boundaries of societies and convey universal themes such as religion, justice, and the passage of time.

§110.19. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 7, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(27) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to present a critique of a literary work, film, or dramatic production, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, a variety of natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

§110.20. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 8, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(3) Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A) analyze literary works that share similar themes across cultures;

4) Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to compare and contrast the relationship between the purpose and characteristics of different poetic forms (e.g., epic poetry, lyric poetry). 

Detailed Description of Program 

Within the library a video about Angel Island will loop throughout the day for patrons to watch. In addition, images of Angel Island poetry will be placed around the library for viewing. A recording device will be attached to the Angel Island poetry images, and patrons may push the play button to hear the translated version of the poem. Whiteboards or chalkboards will be made available to patrons for them to write their own short poems about their reactions, their experiences, and their lives. The librarian or assigned person will video patrons reading their poetry and sharing a short bit of inspiration. These videos will be put together using iMovie or Animoto and attached to the library's website. 

List of Supplies 

  • Source to show video about Angel Island (laptop, iPad, Data Projector...)
  • Images of Angel Island poems and their translations
  • Recording Device, (Example: Talk Point Portable Message Recorder by Learning Resources, EchoBot Voice Messenger by Mel)
  • Whiteboards or Chalkboards
  • Dry Erasers or Chalk
  • Video Camera
  • Computer to create video (iMovie, Animoto, MovieMaker...) 

Incentives 

  • Celebration of Diversity
  • Personal satisfaction
  • Collaboration with schools
  • Picture in Newspaper
  • Selected to be featured on video for library 

Resources 


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Self-Directed Program
Dragon Paper Chains 

Printable Copy

Introduction/Purpose of Program

In this program, students will identify genre and read self-select books from various genres.

TEKS

113B. Middle school social studies

(15D) Culture. The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in various world societies. The student is expected to analyze the experiences and evaluate the contributions of diverse groups to multicultural societies.

(19A) Culture. The student understands the relationships among religion, philosophy, and culture. The student is expected to explain the relationship among religious ideas, philosophical ideas, and cultures.

(19B) Culture. The student understands the relationships among religion, philosophy, and culture. The student is expected to explain the significance of religious holidays and observances such as Christmas, Easter, Ramadan, the annual hajj, Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashanah, Diwali, and Vaisakhi in various contemporary societies.

110B. Middle School English Language Arts

(1) The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts...Students should read and write on a daily basis.

(3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A) infer the implicit theme of a work of fiction, distinguishing theme from the topic;

(B) analyze the function of stylistic elements (e.g., magic helper, rule of three) in traditional and classical literature from various cultures

(C) compare and contrast the historical and cultural settings of two literary works.

(4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how figurative language (e.g., personification, metaphors, similes, hyperbole) contributes to the meaning of a poem.

(5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the similarities and differences in the setting, characters, and plot of a play and those in a film based upon the same story line.

(6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

(7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in memoirs and personal narratives and compare their characteristics with those of an autobiography.

Detailed Description of the Program

Chinese Dragon Paper Chain Competition--During the months of January and February, ELA classrooms have a "competition" to see which classes read the most books in the two-month period. For every book a student reads, he or she will write the title and his/her name on a colored strip of construction paper. Each teacher will have a "dragon head" in the library to attach the paper chain to.

  1. The teacher chain could be for each period (so, six different chains for a teacher who teaches six class periods of ELA), or there could be one chain per teacher, and all that teacher's classes are added to the one teacher chain. Librarians or teachers who prefer to differentiate class periods could use one chain for all the teacher's classes but have each class period use a different color of paper for their chain links (for example, first period adds green links, second adds does blue links, etc.)
  2. Chains stretch around the library. The classroom with the highest number of paper chains on the dragon could receive an incentive such as a lunch pizza party in the library for the class or hat or pajama day coupons.
  3. Variation--Instead of a competition, create one dragon chain for each selected genre (for example: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama as listed in the TEKS above). When a student reads a book from a particular genre, he/she adds a link to that dragon. For example, if a student read a poetry book, he/she adds a link to the poetry dragon.

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

Display/book talk fiction and nonfiction books featuring dragons, the fantasy genre, nonfiction about China, Chinese New Year, Chinese Zodiac. 

List of Supplies

  • Construction paper, cut into strips 
  • One small dragon head to represent each class, teacher, or genre--have students create them, or just print them from clipart 
  • Lots of books!

Incentives

  • The ability for students to self-select the books they read is a huge motivator.
  • Pizza party at lunch for class with most links on their dragon by the end of February
  • Weekly drawing for participating students--could put small items (pencils, pens, bookmarks, etc.) inside Chinese take out boxes (about 50 cents each Oriental Trading)

Resources

  • Chinese New Year Calendar--Lists Chinese New Year calendar dates and corresponding animals from 1930-2030. 
  • Chinese New Year--What is the Chinese New Year and how is it celebrated? This site is child-friendly, simple, and includes lots of photos.

Professional Resources (for librarian and teacher use)

  • Pinterest--Includes lots of Chinese New Year teaching ideas for all grade levels 

 

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Resources

Academic Program

Active Program

Book Quiz

Read-A-Likes

Self-Directed Program


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Created on Mar 24, 2014 | Last updated July 15, 2015