Author Feature-Lee Bacon

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Lee Bacon

Lee Bacon

Joshua Dread

Lee Bacon was born in College Station, Texas, to parents who never once tried to destroy the world (at least not that he knows of). He began writing as an elementary school student with the intention of making his classmates laugh. He has held many different jobs including farm laborer, assistant literary agent, and art gallery assistant. He currently resides, with two cats, in New York. 



 

Find him on the web:

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Book Trailer


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Joshua Dread Book Quiz

Printable Copy

Questions

  1. What secret was Joshua hiding about his parents?
    1. That they were his adoptive parents
    2. They were supervillains that go by the name the Dread Duo
    3. They were boring people
    4. They were superheroes
  2. What is Joshua's Gyft?
    1. Spontaneous combustion
    2. Invisibility
    3. Control weatherd
    4. Control zombies
  3. What happened to Phineas Vex at the Vile Fair?
    1. Captain Justice blasted him with electricity
    2. Sophie's robot took him away
    3. He disappeared
    4. A large bubble came over him
  4. What secret had Sophie been hiding?
    1. She was a supervillain
    2. Her dad is Captain Justice
    3. Her dad is Phineas Vex
    4. She made the smoke creatures
  5. Why did the Dread Duo want the zenoplyric acid?
    1. To dissolve the titanium casing on the creatures tracking device
    2. To foil Captain Justice's plan to make evil clones
    3. To kill the zombies that had escaped
    4. To use it to make Joshua's bike fly
  6. Why did Joshua urge Stanley to drive by the ChemiCo Labs so quickly?
    1. The Dread Duo was breaking into the lab
    2. Captain Justice was there and might see him
    3. He knew a detonator had been set to go off
    4. There was a fire at the lab
  7. How did Joshua, Milton, and Sophie travel to Carrolshire?
    1. In a limo driven by Stanley
    2. By train
    3. Inside an ice cream truck
    4. On old hover scooters
  8. What did Sophie tell Joshua about her mom?
    1. Mrs. Dread was her mom's sister
    2. She was Vex's daughter
    3. She was killed by a car explosion set by Vex.
    4. She was destroyed by her own powers
  9. Who finally defeated Vex?
    1. Captain Justice
    2. Sophie
    3. Joshua
    4. Milton
  10. Joshua was proud of his parents when he saw them doing what?
    1. Giving Milton a replacement autograph of Captain Justice
    2. Arriving at school to take down an escaped zombie
    3. Taking an oath to become superheroes
    4. Keeping a passenger plane from crashing


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Academic Program
History's Villians and Anti-Heroes 

Printable Copy

Introduction/Purpose of Program

Students should choose a figure from history who has gone down as a villain or anti-hero. They should look to choose less obvious figures than Hitler or Al Capone and perform research about the life and legacy of these individuals.

TEKS

§110.18. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 6

(22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate open-ended questions to address the major research topic; and

(B) generate a research plan for gathering relevant information about the major research question.

(23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A) follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;

(B) differentiate between primary and secondary sources;

(C) record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;

(D) identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and

(E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources

(24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A) refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and

(B) evaluate the relevance and reliability of sources for the research.

(25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A) compiles important information from multiple sources;

(B) develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;

(C) presents the findings in a consistent format; and

(D) uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).

§110.19. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 7 & 8

(22) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and

(B) apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.

(23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A) follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies;

(B) categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information;

(C) record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and

(D) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of using valid and reliable sources.

(24) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A) narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and

(B) utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful and relevant than another.

(25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A) draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way;

(B) marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions;

(C) presents the findings in a meaningful format; and

(D) follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas.

§113.18. Social Studies, Grade 6

(2) History. The student understands the influences of individuals and groups from various cultures on various historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and describe the influence of individual or group achievements on various historical or contemporary societies such as the classical Greeks on government and the American Revolution on the French Revolution; and

(B) evaluate the social, political, economic, and cultural contributions of individuals and groups from various societies, past and present.

(21) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(D) identify different points of view about an issue or current topic

(E) identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced participants in an event;

(2) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues through the Mexican National Era shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) compare the cultures of American Indians in Texas prior to European colonization such as Gulf, Plains, Puebloan, and Southeastern;

(B) identify important individuals, events, and issues related to European exploration of Texas such as Alonso Álvarez de Pineda, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and his writings, the search for gold, and the conflicting territorial claims between France and Spain;

(C) identify important events and issues related to European colonization of Texas, including the establishment of Catholic missions, towns, and ranches, and individuals such as Fray Damián Massanet, José de Escandón, Antonio Margil de Jesús, and Francisco Hidalgo;

(D) identify the individuals, issues, and events related to Mexico becoming an independent nation and its impact on Texas, including Texas involvement in the fight for independence, José Gutiérrez de Lara, the Battle of Medina, the Mexican federal Constitution of 1824, the merger of Texas and Coahuila as a state, the State Colonization Law of 1825, and slavery;

(E) identify the contributions of significant individuals, including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, Erasmo Seguín, Martín De León, and Green DeWitt, during the Mexican settlement of Texas; and

(F) contrast Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo purposes for and methods of settlement in Texas.

(3) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) trace the development of events that led to the Texas Revolution, including the Fredonian Rebellion, the Mier y Terán Report, the Law of April 6, 1830, the Turtle Bayou Resolutions, and the arrest of Stephen F. Austin;

(B) explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Texas Revolution, including George Childress, Lorenzo de Zavala, James Fannin, Sam Houston, Antonio López de Santa Anna, Juan N. Seguín, and William B. Travis;

(C) explain the issues surrounding significant events of the Texas Revolution, including the Battle of Gonzales, William B. Travis's letter "To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World," the siege of the Alamo and all the heroic defenders who gave their lives there, the Constitutional Convention of 1836, Fannin's surrender at Goliad, and the Battle of San Jacinto; and

(D) explain how the establishment of the Republic of Texas brought civil, political, and religious freedom to Texas.

(4) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of the Republic of Texas and early Texas statehood. The student is expected to:

(A) identify individuals, events, and issues during the administrations of Republic of Texas Presidents Houston, Lamar, and Jones, including the Texas Navy, the Texas Rangers, Edwin W. Moore, Jack Coffee Hays, Chief Bowles, William Goyens, Mary Maverick, José Antonio Navarro, the Córdova Rebellion, the Council House Fight, the Santa Fe Expedition, public debt, and the roles of racial and ethnic groups;

(B) analyze the causes of and events leading to Texas annexation; and

(C) identify individuals, events, and issues during early Texas statehood, including the U.S.-Mexican War, the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, population growth, and the Compromise of 1850.

(5) History. The student understands how events and issues shaped the history of Texas during the Civil War and Reconstruction. The student is expected to:

(A) explain reasons for the involvement of Texas in the Civil War such as states' rights, slavery, sectionalism, and tariffs;

(B) analyze the political, economic, and social effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction in Texas; and

(C) identify significant individuals and events concerning Texas and the Civil War such as John Bell Hood, John Reagan, Francis Lubbock, Thomas Green, John Magruder and the Battle of Galveston, the Battle of Sabine Pass, and the Battle of Palmito Ranch.

(6) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century. The student is expected to:

(A) identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the factors leading to the expansion of the Texas frontier, the effects of westward expansion on American Indians, the buffalo soldiers, and Quanah Parker;

(B) identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the development of the cattle industry from its Spanish beginnings and the myths and realities of the cowboy way of life;

(C) identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the effects of the growth of railroads and the contributions of James Hogg; and

(D) explain the political, economic, and social impact of the agricultural industry and the development of West Texas resulting from the close of the frontier.

(7) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas during the 20th and early 21st centuries. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the political, economic, and social impact of the oil industry on the industrialization of Texas;

(B) define and trace the impact of "boom-and-bust" cycles of leading Texas industries throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries such as farming, oil and gas production, cotton, ranching, real estate, banking, and computer technology;

(C) describe and compare the impact of the Progressive and other reform movements in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries such as the Populists, women's suffrage, agrarian groups, labor unions, and the evangelical movement of the late 20th century;

(D) describe and compare the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in Texas in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movements, including James L. Farmer Jr., Hector P. Garcia, Oveta Culp Hobby, Lyndon B. Johnson, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Jane McCallum, and Lulu Belle Madison White;

(E) analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major events, including World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II, on the history of Texas; and

(F) analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major events in the latter half of the 20th and early 21st centuries such as major conflicts, the emergence of a two-party system, political and economic controversies, immigration, and migration.

§113.20. Social Studies, Grade 8

(2) History. The student understands the influences of individuals and groups from various cultures on various historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to

(A) identify and describe the influence of individual or group achievements on various historical or contemporary societies such as the classical Greeks on government and the American Revolution on the French Revolution; and

(B) evaluate the social, political, economic, and cultural contributions of individuals and groups from various societies, past and present.

Detailed Description of the Program

Students will perform research on historical villains or anti-heroes, both confirmed and perceived. Students will gather research through reliable sources and make a determination on how history has viewed their subject. The final product would be presented to classmates as a speech, video, power point slide show, or some other creative means to communicate the information.

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

Biographies on historical villains and anti-heroes as needed. Examples from comics and graphic novels for characteristics of villains anti-heroes like the Penguin, The Joker, Blade, or The Punisher as needed. (TBD)

List of Supplies

Research materials (books, databases, computers, etc.)

Resources (print and electronic)

Professional Resources (for librarian and teacher use)

Wicked History series by Scholastic

 

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Active Program
Comic Con

Printable Copy

Detailed Description of the Program

This is a celebration of heroes and villains. If possible, see if a local comic book store can provide comics or set up a booth. Contact illustrators as possible guest speakers. Set up booths such as: mask the super (like pin the tail on the donkey), Are You a Hero or a Villain? (Joshua Dread programming), Web Shooting Power Practice (stilly string), Bomb Detonation (balloon popping), Photo Booth with Cityscape background, Create a secret identity ID (photo booth with glasses, mustache, hats, anything you'd need to blend in) etc.

Program Related Books or Book Talk

Joshua Dread Read-A-Like List

List of Supplies

  • Decorations
  • Bunting made from copies of book covers and comic books
  • Super phrases (POW, BAM, ZAP, BOOM, etc)
  • Possible Foods
  • Strawberries (enhance agility)
  • Broccoli (builds muscles)
  • Carrots (vision)
  • Blueberries (Energy Boost)
  • Grapes (increase elasticity)
  • Olives (boost invisibility)
  • Jello (kryptonite)
  • Rock Candy (kryptonite)
  • Super Bubble bubble gum
  • Licorice Whips (whips)
  • Super Stretch (taffy)
  • Super Heros (sandwiches)
  • Cat claws (Bugle chips)
  • POWERade
  • POPcorn

Possible Music

Soundtracks

  • The Amazing Spider-Man
  • The Avengers
  • Batman
  • Batman Begins
  • Batman & Robin
  • Batman Forever
  • Captain America
  • The Dark Knight
  • Iron Man
  • Lois & Clark
  • Man of Steel
  • Thor

Singles

  • Batdance- Prince
  • Flash- Queen
  • Ghost Rider - Suicide
  • Gotham City - R.Kelly
  • Hero - Nickelback
  • Heroes and Villains - The Beach Boys
  • Holding Out for a Hero - Bonnie Tyler
  • I Can't Decide - Scissor Sisters
  • Iron Man - Black Sabbath
  • Magneto & Titanium Man - Paul McCartney
  • Particle Man - They Might Be Giants
  • Power Girl - Black Eyed Peas
  • Skullcrusher Mountain - Jonathan Coulton
  • Supergirl - Krystal Harris
  • Superman - Eminem
  • Superman - Cracker
  • Superman - Five for Fighting
  • Superman's Dead - Our Lady Peace
  • Villain Song - Kirby Krackle
  • When You're Evil - Voltaire

Resources

Professional Resources (for librarian and teacher use)

 

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Self-Directed Program
Hero or Villian 

Printable Copy

Introduction/Purpose of Program

Patrons will take a quiz to determine if they are a hero or a villain in a story and then create their hero or villain self.

Detailed Description of the Program

Patrons will take a quiz to determine if they are a hero or a villain in a story and create their hero or villain self. 

Patrons will take the quiz Hero or Villain? Based on the outcome of their quiz, they will use the Uniform Page to draw their uniform and create a personality. They may also create a mask or cuff using a mask template and toilet paper roll for the cuff.

Optional: Patrons could make a cape from pillowcases. 

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

Joshua Dread Read-A-Like List 

List of Supplies

Resources

 

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Resources

Academic Program

Active Program

Program Flyer

Program Labels

Book Quiz

Read-A-Likes

Self-Directed Program

Hero or Villian Quiz

Uniform Design Page


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Created on Mar 24, 2014 | Last updated July 15, 2015