Author Feature-Veronica Goldbach

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Veronica Goldbach

Veronica Goldbach

Deep in the Heart of High School

Veronica Goldbach grew up in San Antonio, Texas, and went to school less than five minutes away from the Alamo. After receiving a B.A. in humanities and an M.A. in teaching middle grades from Trinity University, she became a public school teacher. She has taught English as a second language at inner-city middle and elementary schools in San Antonio as well as in South Central Los Angeles.

Veronica became interested in writing young adult fiction while trying to find novels that her seventh-grade students could relate to and also enjoy. Veronica is currently teaching future writers in San Antonio. She lives in the inner city, close to where she grew up. Veronica shares her home with two dogs, two cats, two guinea pigs, and her sister, Theresa.



 

Find her on the web:

Facebook
Twitter
Blog
YouTube



If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:



Book Trailer




If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:



Book Quiz

Download a printable copy of quiz

Multiple Choice

  • What does Fatima learn about her mother?
    • She doesn’t like chocolate.
    • She is good at math.
    • She loves to watch TV.
    • She does not like to clean.
  • Where is Vanna from?
    • A Suburb of Dallas
    • Paris, Texas
    • New York
    • California
  • What is Rosa’s favorite movie?
    • The Outsiders
    • Twilight
    • Wuthering Heights
    • Tarzan
  • How long has Alex secretly liked Fatima?
    • Since 7th grade
    • Since Kindergarten
    • Since Sophomore year
    • Since 3rd grade
  • Where is the last place the high school band played?
    • A football game
    • The Flambeau Parade
    • The Band Hall 
    • On the Track
  • The place where Vanna had her birthday dinner reminded her of what? 
    • The Alamo 
    • The Jetsons 
    • Los Angeles 
    • New York
  • Why was Olivia not allowed to attend the Homecoming Dance?
    • Boys would be there
    • She needed to clean the kitchen 
    • She was in trouble 
    • Her sister had a dance performance
  • What does Fatima’s niece’s name mean?
    • Cutie Pie
    • Sweetheart 
    • Honey 
    • Darling
  • What instrument did the love of Olivia’s life play?
    • Trumpet 
    • Drums 
    • French horn 
    • Saxophone
  • Fatima’s family has it’s own business.  What kind of business is it? 
    • Plumbing 
    • Air conditioning 
    • Accounting
    • Construction

Short Answer

  1. Who was your favorite character and why?  Give an example from the book.
  2. Why was Alex so upset that Fatima was doing Carlos’s homework? 
  3. Explain how and why Vanna’s mother tricked her into seeing her father.


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:



Friendship Bracelets

Download printable copy of program

This program is designed to:

In Veronica Goldbach’s Deep in the Heart of High School, friendship is the key theme. Without the friendship of the main characters, the story would not have happened. In this activity, teens will be creating a friendship bracelet to share with a friend.

Length of Program:

The program is designed to be mainly patron self-sufficient so the length depends on how long you would like to leave the station available.

Preparation:

Materials
7 strands of yarn, each 24 inches long
1 piece of cardboard (can also use cereal boxes)
scissors

Resources
This easy to create friendship bracelet was taken from the website Homemade Gifts Made Easy. Other great tutorial websites for creating friendship bracelets are listed below.

Preparation

  1. Before the program begins, you should become familiar with the use of the braiding wheel to create the bracelet.  You could also have a short training session with teen volunteers that can assist others the day of the program.
  2. Braiding Wheel:  You have 2 options to take into consideration.  You could prepare several braiding wheels ahead of time for patrons to use or you could just provide the cardboard and allow them to create their own braiding wheel.  It is very easy to do so I would suggest allowing them to create their own.
  3. Yarn:  You also have 2 options here.  You could pre-cut the yarn to 24 inches so that patrons just get what they need or you could allow them to cut their own pieces.  This depends on how much you would like to prepare ahead of time.
  4. Instructions:  Create a few poster board size set of instructions with photos to post in the area for patrons to make reference to.  There is also a great video tutorial that you could download and have ready at a computer station.

Books to share:

Non-fiction informational books about friendship and how to create friendship bracelets are great reference materials. Here are few to get you started.

  1. A Good Friend: How to make one, how to be one (Boys Town Teens and Relationships) by Ron Herron and Val J. Peter – YA
  2. Beading: bracelets, barrettes, and beyond by Thiranut Boonyadhistarn – Grades 3-6
  3. Friendship bands: braiding, weaving, knotting by Marlies Busch – YA
  4. Friendship Bracelets by Camilla Gryski – Grades 3-6
  5. Friendship Bracelets 102 by Suzanne McNeill – AD
  6. Making Choices and Making Friends: the social competencies assets by Pamela Espeland and Elizabeth Verdick – Grades 3-6
  7. Real Friends vs the other kind by Annie Fox - Grades 5-8
  8. The Girls’ Book of Friendship by Scholastic – Grades 3-6
  9. The How Rude! Handbook of Friendship by Alex J. Packer – YA

(Readalikes) If you liked Deep in the Heart of High School, then try these great fiction titles.

  1. A little friendly advice by Siobhan Vivian - Ages 12 – up
  2. Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins - Grades 6 – 9
  3. Donut Days by Lara Zielin - Grades 7 – 10
  4. Girlfriend Material by Melissa Kantor - Grades 6 - 9
  5. Hidden by Helen Frost - Grades 5 – up
  6. How not to be popular by Jennifer Ziegler - Ages 12 – up
  7. Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool - Grade 5 - 8
  8. Notes from an Accidental Band Geek by Erin Dionne - Grade 5 – up
  9. Shug by Jenny Han - Grade 5 – 8
  10. The Opposite of Invisible by Liz Gallagher - Grade 8 – 10
  11. The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (series) by Ann Brashares - Ages 12 – up
  12. The Sweetheart of Prosper County by Jill Alexander - Grade 8 - up

Bulletin Board:

  1. Create a large Wordle using key terms about friendship. You can create your Wordle at http://www.wordle.net/. Here is a list to get you started:
    •  trustworthy
    • helpful
    • kind
    • understanding
    • patient
    • loyal
    • considerate
    • honest
    • compassionate
    • respectful
    • dependable
    • sincere
    • supportive
  2. You could also create a bulletin board with famous friendship quotes. Sites with lists of friendship quotes are listed below.

Activities:

Patrons will create friendship bracelets using a simple braiding wheel. As an alternative, patrons can use instructions to create more difficult braiding techniques. (Print outs of other techniques can be made available.)

Refreshments:

Great friends are generally seen as a pair.  So a cute refreshment idea is to serve popular paired items to show their “friendship” and compatibility.

Drinks:

Tea with lemon
Cran-Grape Juice
Cherry Limeade

Food:

Peanut Butter and Jelly
Ham and Cheese

Snacks:

Strawberry-Kiwi
Colby Jack Cheese
Caramel Popcorn
Coke or Root Beer Floats
Chips and Dips
Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups

Guest Speakers:

Contact local school counselors about having a discussion panel about “What Makes a Friend Worth the Title?”  Create a list of questions you could ask the panel to open up the discussion. You can have them begin with discussing positive friendship qualities versus negative qualities. Then open up questions to the audience.

Websites

Brainy Quote - This site contains a listing of friendship quotes.

The Friendship Page- This site contains a listing of friendship quotes.

Wordle- This site generates “word clouds.”  A “word cloud” is simply a visual depiction of words and their importance in a group.

Homemade Gifts Made Easy- This site offers a picture tutorial of how to make a friendship bracelet using yarn as well as a video component.

MakingFriends.com- This site shows how to create a Floss Friendship Bracelet.

Friendship-Bracelets.net- This site contains a listing of several types of friendship bracelet tutorials.

Kaboose- This site shows how to create an Easy Braided Friendship Bracelet.

DLTK’s Sites- This sites shows how to create a Basic Friendship Bracelet.

BillyBear4Kids.com- This site shows how to create letters in friendship bracelets.

Craft Design Online- This site allows you to create your own design for a friendship bracelet.  You create the design and then print out the patterned braiding wheel.

Wonderopolis- This site contains a how to video as well as gives a little history behind the friendship bracelet.

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:



Trust

Download printable copy of program

Download Friendship Formula Image

Length of Program- Flexible 

This program is designed to:

As children move into young adulthood, peers begin to become a more important aspect of the teen’s world. They begin to look to their friends for guidance and support. In Veronica Goldbach’s Deep in the Heart of High School, we see this taking place as 3 teens look to each other for emotional support. Their friendship is one of respect, trust, and shared values. In this program, teens will learn about trust and cooperation to become effective team players while developing new friendships.

Preparation:

Various preparations will be needed based upon the activities chosen.

Books to Share

(Readalikes) If you liked Deep in the Heart of High School, then try these great fiction titles.

  1. A little friendly advice by Siobhan Vivian - Ages 12 – up
  2. Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins - Grades 6 – 9
  3. Donut Days by Lara Zielin - Grades 7 – 10
  4. Girlfriend Material by Melissa Kantor - Grades 6 - 9
  5. Hidden by Helen Frost - Grades 5 – up
  6. How not to be popular by Jennifer Ziegler - Ages 12 – up
  7. Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool - Grade 5 - 8
  8. Notes from an Accidental Band Geek by Erin Dionne - Grade 5 – up
  9. Shug by Jenny Han - Grade 5 – 8
  10. The Opposite of Invisible by Liz Gallagher - Grade 8 – 10
  11. The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (series) by Ann Brashares - Ages 12 – up
  12. The Sweetheart of Prosper County by Jill Alexander - Grade 8 - up

Bulletin Board

Create a large friendship formula. Make each word in the formula a different color so it will stand out. Here is an example of a friendship formula (A downloadable file of this image is available at the top of the page):

Friendship Formula

Center the word Friendship on the bulletin board. Surround it with puzzle pieces that have traits that a good friend should have. Ex: loyalty, honesty, kind, dependable, etc.

Communication Concepts:

  • Distinguishing the difference between verbal and nonverbal communication.
  • Understanding the impact of nonverbal communication.
  • Levels of encoding ability as related to familiarity with others.
  • Small Group Leadership
  • Small Group Interaction and Problem-Solving Skills

Activities:

Trust is an essential component in developing healthy relationships.  In order to create strong lasting bonds, teens must feel safe and comfortable with their friendships.  Building trust is key.  There are dozens of exercises that are effective for developing communication skills, cooperation and trust.  They are also entertaining.  Activities that can be used is:

  • Human Knot With a Twist!-We played this many times. The class was divided into two circles. Each circle then grabbed hands of anyone who was not next to you. The first time through we "unraveled" this knot verbally and nonverbally engaged. The second time we formed the knot, however, we could only use nonverbal communication in the "unraveling" process.
  • Follow the Leader-A hilarious copycat game in which people try to imitate one leader’s actions, and the person in the center attempts to identify who is the originator of the actions (the leader). Ages: 8 and up. Recommended # of People: One group of 8 to 16 people. Messiness factor: Might break a sweat. Materials: None. Setting: Indoors or outdoors.
  • Hula Hoop Pass- Have the group form a circle holding hands. Ask two people to let go of their grip long enough for them to place their hands through a hula hoop before rejoining them. The team task is to pass the hula hoop around the circle in a specified direction until it returns to the starting point. Another way to play is two use two hoops and have them go around the circle in opposite directions. You can also use loops of rope (about hula hoop size). 

See websites below for more activity ideas.

Resources:

DVDs/Videos/Films:

Games that Kick -(website where to purchase) A series of full-length how-to facilitate videos.

Websites:

Livestrong.com-This site has several activities that can be used from trust games for kids to friendship games for girls.

Group-games.com-This site is an index of games that range from ice breakers to team building.

Team Building Exercises- This is an online document that has 15 pages of team building exercises that give the goals, materials and preparation of each activity.

Ultimate Camp Resource- This site has team building and trust activities as well as others can be used.

Ice Breakers- This site has a list of activities submitted by university students.

Teampedia- This is a good site for teambuilding activities.

Great Group Games- This site is great for finding games that are easy to implement.


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:



My City 101
Visitor's Guide

Download a printable copy of program

Additional Documents:

Information Sheet
Rubric
Template

This program is designed to:

In Veronica Goldbach’s Deep in the Heart of High School, the spirit of the city is seen through the eyes of the main character new to town, Vanna.  She is exposed to the nuances of her new home and experiences the feeling of pride as she becomes a resident of her new surroundings.  This activity requires participants to think about where a person new to their town should visit to really get to know the area and create a visitor’s guide that outlines these landmarks.

Length of Program:  Flexible

Preparation:

  1. Obtain samples of Visitor Guides for different cities.
  2. Bookmark online Visitor Guides to share.
  3. Contact your local Visitor Center for short video to showcase your area.
  4. Contact a Travel Agency to inquire about a guest speaker.
  5. Gather print resources from your school library for students to use.
  6. Collect any materials you wish students to use for the project. If you are having students complete a paper version of the guide, some materials you might consider would be:  construction paper, scissors, glue, markers, and colored pencils.
  7. Download copies of the Information Sheet, Rubric, and Visitor’s Guide template.

Books to Share:

Non-fiction informational books about your locale are great reference materials to begin the process of locating facts.  Here are few to get you started.

  • Blevins, Don. Texas towns: from Abner to Zipperlandville. Lanham, MD: Republic of Texas Press, 2003. Print.
  • Davis, Joe Tom. Historic towns of Texas. Austin, Tex.: Eakin Press, 1992. Print.
  • Garoogian, David. Profiles of Texas. 3rd ed. Amenia, N.Y.: Grey House Publishing, 2011. Print.
  • Michael, Linda Lewis, and Patrick Lewis. Big as Texas: the A to Z tour of Texas cities and places. Dallas, Tex.: Hendrick-Long Pub. Co., 1988. Print.
  • Texas Almanac 2012-2013:Texas State historical Association. Denton: Texas State Historical Association, 2012. Print.
  • Ward, Delbert R. The urban stars in the Texas crown. New York, N.Y.: Carlton Press, 1991. Print.

(Readalikes) If you liked Deep in the Heart of High School, then try these great fiction titles.

  • A little friendly advice by Siobhan Vivian - Ages 12 – up
  • Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins - Grades 6 – 9
  • Donut Days by Lara Zielin - Grades 7 – 10
  • Girlfriend Material by Melissa Kantor - Grades 6 - 9
  • Hidden by Helen Frost  - Grades 5 – up
  •  How not to be popular by Jennifer Ziegler - Ages 12 – up
  • Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool - Grade 5 - 8
  • Notes from an Accidental Band Geek by Erin Dionne - Grade 5 – up
  • Shug by Jenny Han - Grade 5 – 8
  • The Opposite of Invisible by Liz Gallagher - Grade 8 – 10
  • The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (series) by Ann Brashares - Ages 12 – up
  • The Sweetheart of Prosper County by Jill Alexander - Grade 8 - up

Bulletin Board: 

Use a play on the book title.  Put up the phrase “Deep in the heart of *insert the name of your city here*”.  Then get postcards that depict your area from your local souvenir shop and place them all around the phrase.

TEKS:

110.18 ELAR, Grade 6

(b) (13) (A) (B) (C) (D) 

      (14) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

        (22) (A) (B)

        (23) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

        (24) (A) (B)

        (25) (A) (B) (C) (D)

110.19 ELAR, Grade 7

(b) (13) (A) (C) (D) 

      (14) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 

        (22) (A) (B) 

        (23) (A) (B) (C) (D)  

        (24) (A) (B) 

        (25) (A) (B) (C) (D)

110.20 ELAR, Grade 8 

(b) (13) (A) (C) (D)  

      (14) (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 

        (22) (A) (B) 

        (23) (A) (B) (C) (D) 

        (24) (A) (B) 

        (25) (A) (B) (C) (D)

113.19 Social Studies, Grade 7

(b) (19) (A) (B) (C) (D)


Activities:

  1. Begin lesson with a quick write using the prompt, “You just met someone new to your city.  What are the top 3 things they should see, do, or know?  Explain why these things are important to your area.”
  2. Discuss what a visitor’s guide is and share samples with students.
  3. As a class or group, create a list of what all the guides have in common.  What do they all contain? (maps, photos, activities, etc.)
  4. Now explain to students that they will be creating their own visitor’s guide.  Review the information sheet** and rubric** with students. (This can be done individually, as partners, or in small groups.)
  5. Students will then use their Information Sheets to guide their research.  Schedule computer time for students to conduct research as well as to obtain photos (this is a great opportunity for a mini-lesson on copyright).
  6. Once the students have completed their research, they will create their guides with the help of a template** or they can design their own.
  7. The final product can be completed on paper or using technology (ex: Microsoft Word).

**downloadable copies of documents listed under additional documents section at top of page

Refreshments:

Offer a simple snack that is consistent with the local cuisine.  When you think of your city, what food comes to mind.  Ex:  Poteet – Strawberries. 

Guest Speakers:

Ask a local tour agency to come discuss local landmarks that people should visit and their historical significance to the city.

Resources:

DVDs/Videos/Films:

Contact your local visitor’s center to see if they have a short video that showcases your city.

Websites:

The Handbook of Texas Online- This is a multidisciplinary encyclopedia of Texas history, geography, and culture sponsored by the Texas State Historical Association.

National Geographic City Guides- This site contains guides for countries as well as states.  It is a great site to show what important information should be included in a guide.

Online City Guide- This site houses travel guides for cities around the U.S.

Commerce Connection- This site provides links to the chamber of commerce sites for each Texas city.

Texas on Tour- This site is great to find attractions and events for cities in Texas.

San Antonio Visitor’s Guide- This is the online Visitor’s Guide for San Antonio.  It can be used to connect the setting of the book and the project together

Charleston Online Visitor’s Guide- This is an online Visitor’s Guide that can be used to show students an example of what guides include.

Daytona Beach Visitor’s Guide- This is an online Visitor’s Guide that can be used to show students an example of what guides include.

Read Write Think- This site provides a lesson on creating a Travel Brochure that can be used a reference.

Read Write Think Printing Press- This site allows for the creation of a brochure, newspaper, flyer or booklet online.  The book option can be used to create the Visitor’s Guide.  The students can add as many pages as they like to their guide.

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact yart.historian+webmaster@gmail.com

Follow Us:

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version Share this
Created on Sep 5, 2012 | Last updated July 15, 2015